At last

At last, here’s one blogger who sees the situation somewhat as I do. I was beginning to wonder if anyone would say it.

On Wednesday, Donald Trump betrayed his supporters on the issue that has defined his campaign: immigration. Unfortunately, with Hillary setting her campaign on fire left and right, this has gone mostly unnoticed. We need to make noise about this everywhere and immediately.”

Well, here I am, making noise about it in my quiet little corner of the blogging world, if it will do any good.

Why is there so little commentary from the (real) right on this issue? Are people especially quiet because they are uncomfortable with acknowledging the situation after investing so much in the Trump candidacy? Is it peer pressure or a desire not to rock the boat?

Of course there are some comments (I knew there would be) defending Trump’s ‘going for the centrists’ or trying to ‘get more votes’ because it’s all about ”winning.” I’ve heard all this before, when G.W. Bush was in office and campaigning for re-election. The Bushbots said all the same things, and they used the same blustering tone to shout down anybody who dissented. But the dissenters were right all along, as time has shown, while the Bushbots never, ever acknowledged that their guy was indeed selling out not only his base but the American (White) people. But he won, you see, he got re-elected despite his devotion to the ”immigration reform” (amnesty) cause.

As I said then, if we ”win” by compromising, selling out, whoring after minority votes or ‘squishy centrists’, what will we have won? Winning the election is not an end in itself, although politicians seem to see it as such.

And in retrospect, what did we win, by winking at Bush’s moving to the left?

I said before, when the Univision story appeared,  that I would give Trump the benefit of the doubt, and hear what he had to say. What he has said since then has not convinced me that the initial story was ‘a lie’, as his devout followers said.

As to his latest promises to deal with criminals (“cartel members, thugs”) it very much sounds as if his plans to deport immigrants will apply only to illegals who are known criminals. This will leave tens of millions of un-vetted illegals and legals, people with no valid identification or with forged IDs (many of them have multiple fake IDs, which can be purchased most anywhere where there is a large Latino colony). Deporting only known or convicted criminals who are here illegally will be a mere drop in the ocean.

And what’s to stop them from returning multiple times, as so many criminal aliens have done, and are doing?

As for the plan not amounting to ‘amnesty’ because ‘they will have to pay a fine, and back taxes‘, as Trump said, this is much like the earlier amnesty proposals (which the pols said were not amnesty); it’s not much different from the ‘Gang of Eight’ plans.

Trump is supposed to make another statement soon on his immigration plans. But I have a feeling that he will again parse his language carefully so as to mollify his supporters, throwing a few crumbs to his White base. I am open to being proven wrong, but as I’ve said before, he can’t serve two masters. He seems to have betrothed himself to the ‘black community’ whose plight he has expressed so much concern for, and to those ‘terrific people’ who just happen to be here illegally.

G.W. Bush redux.

Update: here’s another blog piece on the subject, from the Unorthodoxy blog.

Déjà vu

Some quotes:

”We have to win the presidency. The way you win the presidency is to have practical plans. What we need to do is allow people to earn legal status where they pay a fine, where they work, where they don’t commit crimes, where they learn English, and over a period of time, they earn legal status. That’s the proper path. “

Further:

[…]” And there should be a path to earned legal status for those that are here. Not amnesty, earned legal status, which means you pay a fine and do many things over an extended period of time.”

“I know there’s disagreement here,” acknowledging boos that came from the right wing crowd. “I feel your pain. But there is no plan to deport 11 million people,[…]We should give them a path for legal status where they work, they don’t get government benefits, where they learn English.”

And though he prioritized security along the nation’s border, he believed the GOP could also broker an agreement on other reform possibilities. “Let’s do it. Let’s control the border[…]There’s nothing wrong with that. There’s nothing that holds back the Republicans from putting a comprehensive plan in place to do it.”

“Having a solution to the fact that we have all of these young people–many of whom are making great contributions, don’t have a connection to their parents’ former country–yeah, of course I’m for it. “

Finally:

“And for the 11.5 million who are here illegally, if they’ve not committed a crime since they’ve been here, I would give them a path to legalization where they pay a fine, back taxes, delay in any kind of benefits they get. I think is a reasonable approach, but not a path to citizenship.

“My position has not changed. The idea that we’re going to go into communities and yank people out of their homes and leave their kids on the porch crying, that’s not what we’re going to do. That’s — that’s just — that’s more promises that will never happen, and the people will become more cynical.”

Question: who said the above?