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Are people easily swayed?

In the midst of the ongoing disaster in Europe, there’s been a lot of discussion of how Germany — which seems to be Ground Zero in the escalating war against Europeans — has become so self-abasing and unwilling to defend herself. ‘How could the Germans’, it’s often asked, ‘go from being a proud and racially conscious people to being self-flagellating, willing to commit national suicide?’

The consensus seems to be that gradually, over the years since WWII ended, the German people were ‘re-educated’ into believing that their past was shameful and evil, and that they had to atone perpetually for their history, especially during WWII. Slowly, between 1945 and now, they became a passive, PC-whipped people thanks to relentless chaming propaganda.

In light of that popular belief, it’s interesting and puzzling to look at this poll, which was taken in Germany in March, 1946. The poll is in a book titled ‘Public Opinion, 1935-46’, edited by Hadley Cantril, published by Princeton University Press, 1951. See the results below:

Germans on race 1946ab

I would have expected different results. It appears, assuming that the respondents gave honest replies, that even by 1946, not that long after the end of the War, that they held very liberal attitudes on race and intermarriage, views that we now call ‘politically correct.’ What does this say, I wonder? Are people’s opinions that shallow and fluid, that they could be reversed so quickly? Surely the globalist, Babelist propaganda merchants (who were at work even then) hadn’t had time to thoroughly change public opinion in Germany.

Incidentally, the book in question has many polls on various subjects, taken in various Western countries, and it’s fascinating — and depressing, at times — to see how different most people’s views were in that time period. I expect I will post more from these polls.

 

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4 thoughts on “Are people easily swayed?

  1. It appears, assuming that the respondents gave honest replies, that even by 1946, not that long after the end of the War, that they held very liberal attitudes on race and intermarriage, views that we now call ‘politically correct.’

    It’s possible that in 1946 Germans thought it would be a good idea to tell opinion pollsters what they wanted to hear – or rather what their American conquerors wanted to hear. I think it’s very unlikely that they gave honest replies.

    Even though opinion pollsters assure participants of anonymity I suspect that a lot of people don’t trust those promises. I certainly don’t. So in any opinion poll there’s always an element of telling the pollsters what they want to hear.

    The purpose of opinion polls is not to measure public opinion. The purpose of opinion polls is to mould and manipulate public opinion.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. My impression of these polls was that those commissioning them were using the results to better influence the public in the ‘right’ direction, that is, toward the kind of attitudes we now call political correctness.
    I considered what you say, that the Germans may have been saying what they thought was expected of them. It’s possible.

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  3. I can tell you from my experience hosting a German exchange student several years ago that the Germans have been shamed into ethnomasochism. Any sort of nationalism or pride in Germany had been beaten out of them, brainwashed as you say in a recent post. I’d like to send you some documents that reflect current thought in Germany regarding how they consider their “Nazi past.” Do you have an email I can send you the pdf files? These are excerpts from interviews with contemporary Germans (in English).

    Liked by 1 person

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