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‘The carnal idea of Nation’

Tiberge at GalliaWatch posted an important piece, one which hasn’t gotten the attention it merits, in my opinion. The title is Protecting and promoting French heritage. However it is really about something deeper than that, something that is brought out in the article which cites Marion Maréchal-Le Pen as well her better-known aunt, Marine Le Pen.
Marion Maréchal-Le Pen wrote a piece for Le Figaro in which she argued for cultural and historical preservation, in which government officials would play a part. Unless nationalists and reactionaries gain power in France, the role played by French government seems wishful thinking at this point, but who knows?

Marion says of her aunt, Marine:

“When she drew up her cultural platform in the shadows of the stones of Mont-Saint-Michel and the abbey of Conques, Marine Le Pen brought into the campaign the carnal idea of Nation.”

I am not sure if there is an alternate translation to the phrase at the end of that quote — “the carnal idea of nation.” However I think I grasp what she means, at least in the context of the speech referred to.  To me, it suggests what I’ve alluded to in a post on the other blog. It implies — to me, at least — the ‘people’ implicit in the very word, ‘nation’. It implies their physical works and achievements — as with the great architecture of old Europe, as well as their works in all the other arts, their intellectual and spiritual heritage.  Their folkways, their language, their customs. This is all of paramount importance in a people’s survival, and it’s not given enough thought and attention, as it has become second-nature for many of us to think of political parties and the whole governmental apparatus along with the economic system. However the latter is not the real nation; a nation is its people, and that people are not economic units or interchangeable consumers or raceless, rootless ciphers.

The entity that is often thought of when we think of a ‘nation’ or a country is only the outer aspect, the physical, whereas the culture is the soul of the people. If that culture is damaged or destroyed, or altered beyond recognition, then it leaves a people bereft of meaning, of continuity, of a sense of identity and of rootedness in the past.

“I can already hear society sarcastically describing us as embittered nostalgia-seekers. In her latest book, Le Crépuscule des idoles progressistes (The twilight of progressive idols) published by Stock, author Bérénice Levet summarized it brilliantly: “The past is not a program, it is a resource.” The past, in truth, is a compass of meaning, a breeding ground of experiences, a haven in which we can take refuge, and even console ourselves in these uncertain times. And our heritage constitutes precisely this past incarnate, this “petrified History.”

With (Marine Le Pen’s) platform we will perpetuate the national pact, that of the common possession of our dead, their dreams, their hopes and their prowess.”

Marion refers to cultural ‘vandals’ in government ministries:

“Their vision of a disincarnate France led them, false right and true left alike, to organize the historic amnesia of our children. They went after our intangible heritage: instilling in our minds the shame of our ancestors, refusing to transmit the national history in the schools, depriving our children of mastery of their own language or abandoning it for “globish”. Then they attacked our material heritage by allowing the stones and tiles to collapse. All the components of our national identity have been the object of their assaults. The whole chain of transmission has in this way been broken.”

Yes, these ‘cultural vandals’ have been at work here in our country, and in all Western, White countries. These vandals obviously know what they are doing; this is not all by accident or happenstance. It’s deliberate.

The political front is one part of this one-sided war against us; I believe that if we lose the spiritual/cultural side of this struggle, we will have little to no chance of restoring our countries. I begin to think more and more that the non-material aspect of the struggle is more important. The political tide may not turn in our favor enough to save us. I think recovering the idea of a nation of flesh-and-blood, of people, is essential to restoring and preserving our folk.

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3 thoughts on “‘The carnal idea of Nation’

  1. I don’t know of a good English translation for “carnal” in the sense in which Marion uses the term, but you see it a lot in Chicano and particularly in Chicano nationalist circles – for example: “Carnalismo is the love and compassion Chicanas y Chicanos have for each other as carnalas y carnales (sisters and brothers).” (http://nativeamericannetroots.net/diary/author/aztlan) or see the web site of the Carnalismo Brown Berets (http://nationalbrownberets.org/about-us/).

    With the word “carnal” referring to flesh it implies a commitment based on blood brotherhood – a sort of bio-cultural identity.

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  2. The political front is one part of this one-sided war against us; I believe that if we lose the spiritual/cultural side of this struggle, we will have little to no chance of restoring our countries. I begin to think more and more that the non-material aspect of the struggle is more important.

    The Culture War was the only war that mattered. By the time conservatives started to realise that there really was a full-scale Culture War that war was already virtually lost. And “conservative” political parties still didn’t care because they were obsessed with economic issues. Their attitude was who cares if our culture is being trashed and our heritage destroyed and our children are being brainwashed – what we need are more tax cuts for the rich.

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  3. That is one of the big failures of ‘conservatism’, or at least, what passes for conservatism these days. Too much focus on the economic and political and a willingness to ‘go with the (leftist) flow on social, cultural, and religious matters.

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